I am a lazy student.How do I get motivated to study?



  • I am a lazy student.How do I get motivated to study?



  • Well,

    1. Offer rewards and privileges for completing homework. Teach your child that they have to complete their work before they can do more enjoyable activities. Try to be consistent, and keep tabs on their access to a cell phone, video games, and other distractions.
    • For example, say, “When you’ve finished your homework, you can play your video game.”
    • You could have them put their phone in a basket and only allow them to access it once they’ve finished an assignment.
    • Some kids do better when they listen to music, so you might find it helpful to make an electronics exception for tunes that motivate your child.
      c7a60269-a714-4e6f-b48c-ac19e8c6d2fb-image.png
    1. Review your child’s work when they’ve finished. Check their math problems or essays to make sure they’ve actually finished their work. If their homework involved studying, have them explain the assigned chapter to see how well they understand the material.
    • Try not to come off like you don’t trust them. Say something like, “I’m not trying to hover or make it seem like I don’t have faith in you. I just want to play on your team and help you do your best.”

    • If you find they’re dishonest about what they’ve been assigned, ask their teacher to initial their assignment book.

    1. Help them break overwhelming tasks into smaller parts. Kids and adults alike usually put off tasks that seem unapproachable. If your child has a big project due, help them figure out how to divide it into more manageable chunks. Write down each step on a calendar, and follow up with them daily to make sure they don’t put off steps until the last minute.If u r a teacher, try to break up big projects by including step-by-step instructions and shorter time frames. Instead of just assigning a long paper, try assigning different deadlines for an outline, first draft, and final draft.

    0b9f8032-89da-4333-8aab-15b6e874da35-image.png

    1. Praise them for small successes. Encouragement is a key part of motivation. Verbal praise, spontaneous rewards, and other forms of encouragement will let your child know that you’re proud of their effort.For example, you could say, “I noticed you’ve been working really hard, and you’ve sat down to do your homework as soon as you get home every day this week. How about I take you out for ice cream?”You could also figure out age-appropriate rewards, like getting them a toy or giving them money to see a movie with their friends.

    2. Look into getting a tutor or extra help from the teacher. It’s tough for anyone to get motivated to do something they don’t understand. If you’re not sure how to explain a lesson more clearly on your own, ask their teacher if they can spend a little time with your child before or after school. You could also see if their school has a peer tutoring program.Contact your child's teacher to find out when they offer tutoring.If it’s in your budget, you could look into hiring a private tutor.If you can't afford a tutor, ask an older sibling, family member, or trusted friend who is strong in that subject to help your child.

    3. Identify underlying causes. Problems at home, bullying, and a range of other issues can also underlie a lack of motivation. When gifted children aren’t challenged, they often become unmotivated. Likewise, undiagnosed learning disabilities are commonly mistaken for laziness.Every child is unique, so parents, teachers, and school counselors or psychologist should work together to resolve specific situations through testing, medication, or counseling.Have a direct conversation with your child. Ask them if they have anything on their mind, are dealing with issues with another student, or are facing any other emotional struggles. Try to reassure them and let them know it's safe to talk to you without fear of judgment. As they talk, observe their non-verbal communication in addition to listening to what they have to say.If you've observed long-term symptoms like difficulty focusing, poor reading comprehension, or trouble following directions, talk to your child's doctor. Ask them to refer you to a psychologist who can diagnose a potential learning disability.



  • Offer rewards and privileges for completing homework. Teach your child that they have to complete their work before they can do more enjoyable activities. Try to be consistent, and keep tabs on their access to a cell phone, video games, and other distractions.

    For example, say, “When you’ve finished your homework, you can play your video game.”

    You could have them put their phone in a basket and only allow them to access it once they’ve finished an assignment.

    Some kids do better when they listen to music, so you might find it helpful to make an electronics exception for tunes that motivate your child.

    a744d35d-1328-4465-9cdd-76eafba3ac78-image.png

    Review your child’s work when they’ve finished. Check their math problems or essays to make sure they’ve actually finished their work. If their homework involved studying, have them explain the assigned chapter to see how well they understand the material.

    Try not to come off like you don’t trust them. Say something like, “I’m not trying to hover or make it seem like I don’t have faith in you. I just want to play on your team and help you do your best.”

    If you find they’re dishonest about what they’ve been assigned, ask their teacher to initial their assignment book.

    Help them break overwhelming tasks into smaller parts. Kids and adults alike usually put off tasks that seem unapproachable. If your child has a big project due, help them figure out how to divide it into more manageable chunks. Write down each step on a calendar, and follow up with them daily to make sure they don’t put off steps until the last minute.If u r a teacher, try to break up big projects by including step-by-step instructions and shorter time frames. Instead of just assigning a long paper, try assigning different deadlines for an outline, first draft, and final draft.

    4Praise them for small successes. Encouragement is a key part of motivation. Verbal praise, spontaneous rewards, and other forms of encouragement will let your child know that you’re proud of their effort.For example, you could say, “
    I noticed you’ve been working really hard, and you’ve sat down to do your homework as soon as you get home every day this week. How about I take you out for ice cream?”You could also figure out age-appropriate rewards, like getting them a toy or giving them money to see a movie with their friends.

    5Look into getting a tutor or extra help from the teacher. It’s tough for anyone to get motivated to do something they don’t understand. If you’re not sure how to explain a lesson more clearly on your own, ask their teacher if they can spend a little time with your child before or after school. You could also see if their school has a peer tutoring program.Contact your child's teacher to find out when they offer tutoring.If it’s in your budget, you could look into hiring a private tutor.If you can't afford a tutor, ask an older sibling, family member, or trusted friend who is strong in that subject to help your child.
    Identify underlying causes. Problems at home, bullying, and a range of other issues can also underlie a lack of motivation. When gifted children aren’t challenged, they often become unmotivated. Likewise, undiagnosed learning disabilities are commonly mistaken for laziness.
    24d1a5f2-9004-4932-95ce-411fbe50309c-image.png
    Every child is unique, so parents, teachers, and school counselors or psychologist should work together to resolve specific situations through testing, medication, or counseling.Have a direct conversation with your child. Ask them if they have anything on their mind, are dealing with issues with another student, or are facing any other emotional struggles. Try to reassure them and let them know it's safe to talk to you without fear of judgment. As they talk, observe their non-verbal communication in addition to listening to what they have to say.If you've observed long-term symptoms like difficulty focusing, poor reading comprehension, or trouble following directions, talk to your child's doctor. Ask them to refer you to a psychologist who can diagnose a potential learning disability.
    We, at Doubtnut always happy to solve query:)



  • JEE is not just another exam where a student can expect himself to get a reputed college only by practicing a number of question, JEE requires a student to be much more than just good with concepts

    Consistency: when a student is working on any conceptual difficulties he needs a long sitting period with great focus so the student rectifies his every doubt. A student can not just hope to cope with the competition without being consistent with his preparation.

    Time Management: managing time for different subjects and everything else just so he can practice his work regularly and spare some time to pursue his hobbies, devoting equal quality time managing health, study and leisure activities is also one of many skills an aspirant required to get through the JEE exam.

    Finding More Exercises: Any IIT aspirant can not expect the best result by only working on questions given to him by his coaching class or by different seniors but he must be ready to check every possible exercise to make sure he equip himself better, get questions from your coaching, ask for exercise from students of different coaching classes, visit different online portals like Doubtnut where you can get extra classes for references sample papers and other things.

    Evaluating Your Strengths: Getting conceptual clarity is not the only thing a student needs to pass JEE there is a pattern to attempt the exam where student make sure he attempts questions of subjects he believe he has upper hand in passing on the question which can get you negative marking and this skill set is arguably one of the most important.

    For any talented student learning concepts would not be a hard thing and his calculations can be better escalated and can be more accurate but when it comes to developing mentioned skill sets which without any doubt are more important than just knowing, a person has to be real hard-worker.

    And I believe hard work and dedication beat talent every time its not about how far you have come but how far you are willing to go.

    Mostly students call themselves lazy and try to get out of studies but in reality mostly it is about the confidence with constant failure students starts procrastinating which slowly and steadily makes a person dull and lazy, What I would recommend is, for you to start NCERT doesn’t matter which level of book you are taking you must bring yourself to basics once you start to find problems with your preparation way.
    other than that if you ever get stuck oon any doubt which you feel is distracting you, you can always use DOUBTNUT WHATSAPP ASSISTANCE on the number 8400400400 and get solution of your each and every doubt, within seconds, and for your conceptual difficulties you can always visit DOUBTNUT APP and get it sorted.

    I hope My Answer helped you.



  • Here are some tips that will help you in getting motivated to study :

    • Don’t do all your studying the night before.I say never! Instead spread it out, review class materials several times a week, and focus on one topic at a time.

    • Find a comfortable place to study with good lighting and few distractions. Avoid studying in bed, as it will be too tempting to take a nap.

    • Get plenty of sleep. Generally people need at least 8 hours of sleep per night. Your brain needs this time to recover and organize information to strengthen its memory.Students normally try to burn the midnight few days before.Please dont do that.Why not start studying from before when you still have time?

    • Carefully choose what you do during your down time. Relaxing your mind is important during study breaks, but TV and video games don’t allow the mind to relax properly.

    • Study with the sound of your own voice. If you’re going to class (and you should be), you might as well make the time you spend taking notes count. When you get the due date for a test, record yourself reading your notes that you took in class, and be sure to include any of your own personal commentary to better understand the material. This takes very little time (depending on how fast/slow you read your notes), and then later when you’re walking to and from class, you can pop your earbuds in and listen to the sweet sounds of portable studying. Now any time you are just going about basic, mundane activities – showering, doing laundry, cleaning – can also be spent studying. Multitasking at its finest

    • You reach for your phone at least a hundred times a day , so why not let it help you do some studying? Make your phone background or lock screen into a study guide. Put formulas, keywords, or class material that you need to know front and center. Every time you go to pick up your phone, you’ll be confronted with the study material, and have a very mini-study session available to you in your pocket at all times.

    • Know that Time flies-yes, my dear Learn the value of time.Its not about having time,Its about making the most of time.

    All the best !!


Log in to reply